skip to Main Content
pta@lafayettepta.com

Girls on the Run

Girls on the runLafayette is launching a Girls on the Run Program in March, and we are looking for a few volunteer coaches! Girls on the Run is a transformational physical activity based positive youth development program for girls in 3rd-5th grade.

Do coaches have to be runners?
Not a runner? Not a problem! Girls on the Run is for anyone looking to inspire our girls to be healthier, more confident, and empowered! This is much more than a running program.

When is the program and how long are practices?
The Girls on the Run season runs from March until May. The girls practice Mondays and Thursdays from 2:30-3:45pm at Lafayette Elementary. As a coach, this means between 5-6 hours per week, including prep time, practice time, and time for communication with families and GOTR staff.

Find out more at: WWW.GIRLSRUN.ORG
Interested parents can contact Carolyn Whipple at cvwhipple@seattleschools.org or 206-252-9525

2018-19 Boundary Proposal

A proposal on Lafayette / Genessee Hill boundaries is being presented at the board meeting tonight. Existing students are grandfathered and it slowly decreases the enrollment at Genessee Hill while increasing enrollment at Lafayette at a steady pace of about 40 students per year. Read more about this proposal in the PDF from the Seattle Schools website.

Give feedback on the enrichment program!

Please provide your feedback to help us guide future enrichment offerings. The PTA does not make a profit from the program, but instead balances the costs of instructors, the cost of administration, the costs to students, and the availability of scholarships on a no questions asked one class per quarter basis, with the objective of breaking even.


Support families across the globe with $1 Hot Cocoa on Thursday, Dec 14th

Give a gift. Change a life.  The Leopard Leaders, our school student council, is having a fundraiser selling cocoa during lunch on Thursday, December 14.  All proceeds will go to buy goats and ducks for people in the developing world through World Vision.

Chickens and a goat provide a steady supply of eggs, milk, and protein to feed children and help families.  A dairy goat can give up to 16 cups of milk a day. Goat’s milk is easier to digest than cow’s milk and is an excellent source of calcium, protein, and other essential nutrients that growing children need. Goats are practical animals — flourishing in harsh climates while producing valuable manure to fertilize crops and vegetable gardens.  Chickens are equally easy to raise and will naturally multiply to impact generations of children. Each family that receives chickens is asked to give back hatched chicks to help another family in need. Chicks require little money, space, or food to thrive and grow. You can see their you tube video here.

Back To Top